Learning Journey — Where A Career Wanders

If I had known at the beginning where my jobs would have led, I might have  scared myself.

I never knew my work journey would take me to 3 different Canadian provinces and cities.   I can’t claim I’m the person that often dashes out on a journey without a  map or a vague idea of destination.  At least not on bike.  Work morphed also into exploring and learning more about different regions of  Canada.

I just set out to find each job however remotely related to my training.  It even  included working on-site at a major construction engineering project. My earlier story is here.

bestscones Restaurant in Osgood Hall courthouse for Ontario Court of Appeal. Toronto ON.  2014. Photo by J.Chong. Where I occasionally bought  best scones for early breakfast before starting work at Judges’ Library elsewhere. 2009 golden ears bridge

Cycling Golden Ears Bridge. Pitt Meadows, Metro Vancouver 2009.  Major piece of a 6-lane 1km. road bridge with bike lane over Fraser River. Construction project where I worked on-site for 3 yrs. GGCV office

Construction engineering main office site where  I worked. Golden Ears Bridge, Langley, British Columbia 2009. Coincidentally a bike ramp bridge was built in front of my office window.

I’ve been incredibly blessed to have worked in some unexpected and contrasting work cultures and different subject disciplines.  Yes, to work in libraries and information management does expose you, even if  briefly, to all sorts of intriguing issues and challenges that beset an organization.

questioning bigger

chiefjusticeosgoode

First Chief Justice of Upper  Canada (now Ontario) William Osgoode, which courthouse building bears its name and Osgoode / Queen St. W. subway station nearby. Courthouse is the oldest in Canada. Photo by J.Chong. Toronto ON 2014 3 stained glass foyer  Stained glass above main front courthouse foyer. Osgoode Hall courthouse, Ontario Court of Appeal. Toronto 2014. Photo by J.Chong

Visual and talking tour of this historic  court building.

https://youtu.be/6YGj2DVwlmw

20 Comments Add yours

  1. Jane Fritz says:

    What an interesting post, Jean. Thank you for sharing your life journey and your observations.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. How cool that you got to live in so many places. When I used to work in film and television sales/ acquisitions, traveling scared me–so much is out of your control, especially in a foreign country. But the one thing I don’t regret in my life are all the trips I made. Wouldn’t trade those experiences and memories for anything.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Jean says:

      Your blog doesn’t reflect unless it’s waaaay back in the past, your life then. Did you travel much for work and where/what highlights were they, or this was time away for you to experience stuff?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. That was all BC (Before Child). The highlight was probably film festivals in Europe, but there was always one in Santa Monica, plus selling syndication rights for TV at various places in the US– New Orleans, for example. I ate in some really nice restaurants, because our company booked/ paid for the tables months in advance. Then someone would bail and an assistant would rush up to me at 5 PM and say, “Can you find three people and take a table for 4 at 7PM at this super expensive exclusive restaurant?!” Of course I could–although sometimes whomever was standing near me didn’t have jackets and the restaurant staff had to supply them with one (very nicely).

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Jean says:

          How unique that job was AutumnA. A person should try job(s) that have them learn in different ways and when they are young, in their career to even leave the comfort of home city for awhile.One thing for certain I couldn’t have a job that would require alot of travel and hotel stays. Eating away from home would probably be disasterous diet-wise and on my self-discipline.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. It absolutely is–I always want to try all the local specialties.

            Liked by 1 person

            1. Jean says:

              🙂 Irresistable

              Liked by 1 person

  3. You are so perceptive, Jean. I also don’t understand how people think they can do a job without ever leaving their desk I’ve been trying to change careers and finding it challenging—it give me hope to see your trajectory.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Jean says:

      Well, most of my job is digital anyway. I also do employee group training which right now is done virtually, though pre-covid, I did classroom software training. You sound like a person that likes to touch/do stuff or at least interact with people which I enjoy latter. It’s what make my jobs interesting and unpredictable in meeting information or software user needs, at times. What type of work have you been doing?

      Like

      1. Will your job go back to being in person soon, now that Covid is (hopefully) subsiding? Yes, I enjoy interacting with people. I’ve been working in Visitor Experience for the last 24 year. My issue is not with the work but that I’ve reach a point where my career growth has stopped. I haven’t really need that much to live on in the past, but my husband has Parkinson’s disease and we’ll have to get a more expensive apartment with an elevator. And then the care he’ll need later is quite expensive.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Jean says:

          The norm for office employees (I work for a municipality) will be working part-time..at 3 times/wk. or less, at discretion and approval of supervisor. We have to state which days we would be in office. Other staff, in-person work didn’t change except for distancing, masking.
          Your blog expresses your natural enthusiasm which I can imagine what you’re like in person. Have you consider working strategy/planning for a large tourism or perhaps an organization that serves multiple client groups or requires multi-stakeholder engagement. Or look at a university for international student affairs/overseas liaison. I know, right now might not be great. I’m sorry to hear about your hubby’s condition. Am hoping you both find a good place.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Thanks for your kindness, Jean. And you certainly are perceptive—I have been applying at the Chicago universities for their study abroad programs. I do think I could do this work well but the problem is they all want you to have education degrees and several years of experience working for a University. So when you apply you can’t even submit an application online if you don’t check the boxes that you meet these requirements. So frustrating!

            Liked by 1 person

            1. Jean says:

              You never know with (partial) remote work now…to apply / approach an international university/specialized college outside of your state / even U.S. ie. take for instance a great art or technical college.

              Liked by 1 person

  4. Mabel Kwong says:

    That is so interesting to hear you’ve worked and lived in different places around Canada, and in different kinds of roles too. I’ve heard about the area libraries and information but never really had a good idea of what it involved – so it sounds like quite a variety of work around knowledge work.

    I think moving around or traveling for work is a good thing. You learn so much going places, meeting new people and adapting to what comes your way – you have to adapt if you want to make it work, learn and grow. A long time ago I did contact work, and that involved a new role once every year or so. Met some lovely people along the way and some we’ve kept in touch though our time together was short. These days I like working from home and it really has made me more productive with less distractions that you can get on site. But I guess work from home also suits certain kinds of roles and not every job out there.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Jean says:

      No doubt, those who couldn’t work from home, probably slightly resent folks like us, especially if they don’t like their job but need to earn money to live. I chose infographic style to illustrate where I’ve been. Photos where I’ve worked wouldn’t do anything, since it’s the “same” type of environment. It’s the information iself, the people and location.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Lani says:

    I love the infograph, and learning more about you. We definitely learn a lot about people, organizations, and what makes things click (or not) in the world of work. In fact, I find it so fascinating that I’d like to write extensively about it, one day, one day!

    And since I’m having such a hard time of it lately at my job, this is a gentle reminder that I will gain something from it, as long as I look for it. xo

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Jean says:

      I look forward to reading about what has been percolating at the back of your mind for awhile, Lani.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Lani says:

        Thanks, you’re too kind. xo

        Like

  6. kegarland says:

    I know this post isn’t about this, but what impressed me is this infographic you created.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Jean says:

      I always have fun making infographics. Have done different ones for this blog over the yrs. But now, running out of ideas. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

Chime in with your thoughts here!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s